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Information center for weather events

winter storm

We’re always ready to respond to issues caused by severe weather. Our highest priority is to provide you with safe, reliable service.

 

Stay up to date on weather related news here and by visiting our Facebook and Twitter page.

Updates


Oct. 10 2019: Our system held through the overnight hours for winter storm Aubrey. There were no weather related impacts to our service territories. 

Oct. 8 2019: The National Weather Service has issued a winter storm watch and warning in many of our service territories. We are actively monitoring the storm and ready to respond. Please select your state below for local information.

 

Read the press release we issued at 4:21 p.m. MDT October 9, 2019.

If you're experiencing a power outage, click the button below to report and monitor your outage.

Report Outage

Electric safety during storms

In the event of an extended electric outage, we work with local news agencies to keep you informed about service restoration. If an electrical service interruption occurs, we will make every effort to restore your power as quickly as possible.

In the event of a power outage, follow these guidelines to stay safe:

  • Never touch or attempt to pick up a fallen power line, and keep children and pets away. Assume any downed power line is energized. If you see a downed power line, call our emergency number 800-694-8989 or 911 immediately.
  • Prepare for an outage by setting up an emergency drawer or kit that’s easy to access, even in the dark. Stock it with fresh batteries, a battery-powered radio and a flashlight. Avoid using candles, lanterns or oil lamps because of the fire risk.
  • Unplug sensitive computer and electronic equipment or protect them with a high-quality surge protector.
  • Do not open your refrigerator or freezer more than necessary. Undisturbed food will remain frozen in most freezers for 12 to 48 hours.
  • Do not use charcoal grills to heat your home or cook indoors. Dangerous carbon monoxide fumes can build up and cause injury or death.
  • If you use a portable generator, follow the manufacturer's safety and operating guidelines. Be sure to operate the generator in a well-ventilated area. Never operate it indoors or in your garage. Again, dangerous carbon monoxide fumes can build up and cause injury or death.

More information

As the homeowner, you’re responsible for maintaining your home’s service mast. Learn more about maintaining and repairing your service mast.

Learn more about what to do when the lights go out.

Learn more about how we prepare for storms.

If you're experiencing a power outage, click the button below to report and monitor your outage.

Report Outage

Electric safety during storms

In the event of an extended electric outage, we work with local news agencies to keep you informed about service restoration. If an electrical service interruption occurs, we will make every effort to restore your power as quickly as possible.

In the event of a power outage, follow these guidelines to stay safe:

  • Never touch or attempt to pick up a fallen power line, and keep children and pets away. Assume any downed power line is energized. If you see a downed power line, call our emergency number 800-694-8989 or 911 immediately.
  • Prepare for an outage by setting up an emergency drawer or kit that’s easy to access, even in the dark. Stock it with fresh batteries, a battery-powered radio and a flashlight. Avoid using candles, lanterns or oil lamps because of the fire risk.
  • Unplug sensitive computer and electronic equipment or protect them with a high-quality surge protector.
  • Do not open your refrigerator or freezer more than necessary. Undisturbed food will remain frozen in most freezers for 12 to 48 hours.
  • Do not use charcoal grills to heat your home or cook indoors. Dangerous carbon monoxide fumes can build up and cause injury or death.
  • If you use a portable generator, follow the manufacturer's safety and operating guidelines. Be sure to operate the generator in a well-ventilated area. Never operate it indoors or in your garage. Again, dangerous carbon monoxide fumes can build up and cause injury or death.

Natural gas safety during storms

Snow and ice buildup on your natural gas meter can create a safety hazard and even cut off the flow of natural gas to your heating equipment and appliances. To avoid trouble, gently remove snow and ice from on and around the meter with your hands or a broom.

Gas meters and regulators are durable and designed with the weather in mind, but a coating of ice or snow could cause a loss of service and become a critical safety issue. If at all possible, remove the snow before it has a chance to freeze.

Vent safety during storms

Our gas crews are experiencing numerous carbon monoxide reports.  Many of these issues are being caused by drifting snow, causing furnace and water heater vents to become blocked.       

Here are some important safety tips for you to know:

  • Make sure that your furnace vent, gas fireplace vent and tankless/conventional water heater vents are free from drifting snow
  • Gently brush the snow away using a soft broom or your hand, being careful to avoid vent damage
  • Install and maintain carbon monoxide detectors and inspect them regularly
  • Make sure batteries are fresh
  • Experts recommend placing one detector on every level of your home
  • Install detectors at of slightly above eye level, as carbon monoxide is lighter than air and will float upward

More information

As the homeowner, you’re responsible for maintaining your home’s service mast. Learn more about maintaining and repairing your service mast.

Learn more about what to do when the lights go out.

Learn more about how we prepare for storms.

Learn more about what to do when you smell natural gas.

Natural gas safety during storms

Snow and ice buildup on your natural gas meter can create a safety hazard and even cut off the flow of natural gas to your heating equipment and appliances. To avoid trouble, gently remove snow and ice from on and around the meter with your hands or a broom.

Gas meters and regulators are durable and designed with the weather in mind, but a coating of ice or snow could cause a loss of service and become a critical safety issue. If at all possible, remove the snow before it has a chance to freeze.

Vent safety during storms

Our gas crews are experiencing numerous carbon monoxide reports.  Many of these issues are being caused by drifting snow, causing furnace and water heater vents to become blocked.       

Here are some important safety tips for you to know:

  • Make sure that your furnace vent, gas fireplace vent and tankless/conventional water heater vents are free from drifting snow
  • Gently brush the snow away using a soft broom or your hand, being careful to avoid vent damage
  • Install and maintain carbon monoxide detectors and inspect them regularly
  • Make sure batteries are fresh
  • Experts recommend placing one detector on every level of your home
  • Install detectors at of slightly above eye level, as carbon monoxide is lighter than air and will float upward

More information

As the homeowner, you’re responsible for maintaining your home’s service mast. Learn more about maintaining and repairing your service mast.

Learn more about what to do when the lights go out.

Learn more about how we prepare for storms.

Learn more about what to do when you smell natural gas.

Natural gas safety during storms

Snow and ice buildup on your natural gas meter can create a safety hazard and even cut off the flow of natural gas to your heating equipment and appliances. To avoid trouble, gently remove snow and ice from on and around the meter with your hands or a broom.

Gas meters and regulators are durable and designed with the weather in mind, but a coating of ice or snow could cause a loss of service and become a critical safety issue. If at all possible, remove the snow before it has a chance to freeze.

Vent safety during storms

Our gas crews are experiencing numerous carbon monoxide reports.  Many of these issues are being caused by drifting snow, causing furnace and water heater vents to become blocked.       

Here are some important safety tips for you to know:

  • Make sure that your furnace vent, gas fireplace vent and tankless/conventional water heater vents are free from drifting snow
  • Gently brush the snow away using a soft broom or your hand, being careful to avoid vent damage
  • Install and maintain carbon monoxide detectors and inspect them regularly
  • Make sure batteries are fresh
  • Experts recommend placing one detector on every level of your home
  • Install detectors at of slightly above eye level, as carbon monoxide is lighter than air and will float upward

More information

As the homeowner, you’re responsible for maintaining your home’s service mast. Learn more about maintaining and repairing your service mast.

Learn more about what to do when the lights go out.

Learn more about how we prepare for storms.

Learn more about what to do when you smell natural gas.

If you're experiencing a power outage, click the button below to report and monitor your outage.

Report Outage

Electric safety during storms

In the event of an extended electric outage, we work with local news agencies to keep you informed about service restoration. If an electrical service interruption occurs, we will make every effort to restore your power as quickly as possible.

In the event of a power outage, follow these guidelines to stay safe:

  • Never touch or attempt to pick up a fallen power line, and keep children and pets away. Assume any downed power line is energized. If you see a downed power line, call our emergency number 800-694-8989 or 911 immediately.
  • Prepare for an outage by setting up an emergency drawer or kit that’s easy to access, even in the dark. Stock it with fresh batteries, a battery-powered radio and a flashlight. Avoid using candles, lanterns or oil lamps because of the fire risk.
  • Unplug sensitive computer and electronic equipment or protect them with a high-quality surge protector.
  • Do not open your refrigerator or freezer more than necessary. Undisturbed food will remain frozen in most freezers for 12 to 48 hours.
  • Do not use charcoal grills to heat your home or cook indoors. Dangerous carbon monoxide fumes can build up and cause injury or death.
  • If you use a portable generator, follow the manufacturer's safety and operating guidelines. Be sure to operate the generator in a well-ventilated area. Never operate it indoors or in your garage. Again, dangerous carbon monoxide fumes can build up and cause injury or death.

Natural gas safety during storms

Snow and ice buildup on your natural gas meter can create a safety hazard and even cut off the flow of natural gas to your heating equipment and appliances. To avoid trouble, gently remove snow and ice from on and around the meter with your hands or a broom.

Gas meters and regulators are durable and designed with the weather in mind, but a coating of ice or snow could cause a loss of service and become a critical safety issue. If at all possible, remove the snow before it has a chance to freeze.

Vent safety during storms

Our gas crews are experiencing numerous carbon monoxide reports.  Many of these issues are being caused by drifting snow, causing furnace and water heater vents to become blocked.       

Here are some important safety tips for you to know:

  • Make sure that your furnace vent, gas fireplace vent and tankless/conventional water heater vents are free from drifting snow
  • Gently brush the snow away using a soft broom or your hand, being careful to avoid vent damage
  • Install and maintain carbon monoxide detectors and inspect them regularly
  • Make sure batteries are fresh
  • Experts recommend placing one detector on every level of your home
  • Install detectors at of slightly above eye level, as carbon monoxide is lighter than air and will float upward

More information

As the homeowner, you’re responsible for maintaining your home’s service mast. Learn more about maintaining and repairing your service mast.

Learn more about what to do when the lights go out.

Learn more about how we prepare for storms.

Learn more about what to do when you smell natural gas.

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